Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

I have never elsewhere had such an opportunity to observe how much more beautiful reflection is than what we call reality. The sky, and the clustering foliage on either hand, and the effect of sunlight as it found its way through the shade, giving lightsome hues in contrast with the quiet depth of the prevailing […]


I never began by consulting the amusement pages to find out what film might chance to be the best, nor did I find out the time the film was to begin. I agreed wholeheartedly with Jacques Vaché in appreciating nothing so much as dropping into the cinema when whatever was playing was playing, at any […]


In the summer of 1935 Man Ray began the shooting of a film at Lise Deharme’s country house in southern France. The other participants were Paul and Nusch Eluard, Jacqueline Lamba and André Breton. Nothing remained from this attempt at simulating cinematographic delirium but the stills and captions above, which appeared in the Cahiers d’art […]


In 1929 André Breton tried  his hand, together with Albert Valentin,  at a screenplay based on Barbey d’Aurevilly’s short story Le Rideau cramoisi (The Crimson Curtain).Nothing came out of this project as they couldn’t find a producer. In 1953 Alexandre Astruc succeeded in making an adaptation of Le Rideau Cramoisi for Anatole Dauman’s company Argos Films. […]


…I prepared a film screening in the Palais de Chaillot dedicated to the cinéma insolite*. André Breton would have acted as host for the event.  The special about this screening would have been to show that in failed or mediocre films there are scenes or shots of unexpected beauty  which amount to surrealist exaltation. But […]


Only a few months ago I was able to satisfy myself, while pondering the single theme of a remarkable film entitled Berkeley Square – the new occupant of an old castle manages, by bringing back to life in his hallucinations those who occupied it in former times, not only to mingle with them but also, […]


Screencap from Peter Ibbetson via Deleuze Cinema Project 1. What is most specific of all the means of the camera is obviously the power to make concrete the forces of love which, despite everything, remain deficient in books, simply because nothing in them can render the seduction or distress of a glance or certain feelings […]